Un yūshō (優勝, yūshō?) désigne le gain d'un tournoi de sumo dans une des six divisions que comporte le sumo professionnel.Lors de chaque honbasho, le lutteur qui a le plus de victoires dans sa division à la fin du tournoi est déclaré vainqueur. En cas d'égalité de victoires à la fin de la dernière journée du tournoi (千秋楽, senshûraku?), un combat supplémentaire appelé kettei-sen (決定戦, kettei-sen?) est organisé entre les lutteurs ex-aequo.

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  • Un yūshō (優勝, yūshō?) désigne le gain d'un tournoi de sumo dans une des six divisions que comporte le sumo professionnel.Lors de chaque honbasho, le lutteur qui a le plus de victoires dans sa division à la fin du tournoi est déclaré vainqueur. En cas d'égalité de victoires à la fin de la dernière journée du tournoi (千秋楽, senshûraku?), un combat supplémentaire appelé kettei-sen (決定戦, kettei-sen?) est organisé entre les lutteurs ex-aequo. Il y a donc six vainqueurs de yūshō par tournoi, un par division : en makuuchi, en jūryō, en makushita, en sandanme, en jonidan et en jonokuchi.Un gain sans aucun défaite est appelé zenshō yūshō (全勝優勝, zenshō yūshō?). Il est rare que deux lutteurs soient invaincus le matin de la dernière journée, avant de s'affronter. Cela n'est arrivé que cinq fois en makuuchi depuis 1958, les deux dernières fois en septembre 1983 (Takanosato (en) contre Chiyonofuji) et en juillet 2012 (Harumafuji contre Hakuho), dont une seule fois sur les cinq entre un ōzeki et un yokozuna, en 2012.En makuuchi, il est également rare qu'un maegashira remporte un honbasho : récemment seuls Kotomitsuki en 2001 et Kyokutenhō (en) en 2012 y sont parvenus. Kyokutenhō est devenu par la même occasion le plus vieux lutteur à gagner un tournoi à l'age de 37 ans et huit mois.En août 2014, les récompenses pour un yūshō étaient de 10 millions de yens en makuuchi, 2 millions de yens en jūryō, 500 000 yens en makushita, 300 000 yens en sandanme, 200 000 yens en jonidan, 100 000 yens en jonokuchi.
  • 우승(優勝)은 스포츠 대회 등에서 주최자가 정한 규칙에 따라 우열을 경쟁하고 그 결과 몇몇 개인 또는 단체가 대회에 참가한 다른 누구보다도 우수하다고 인정받는 것을 말한다. 또한 우승하지 못해 2등을 한 것은 준우승(準優勝)이라고 한다.
  • 優勝(ゆうしょう)とは、スポーツの大会などにおいて、主催者が決めたルールにしたがって優劣を競い、その結果ある個人、もしくは団体が、大会に参加した他の誰よりも優れていると認めること。または、そう認められること。優勝したものは優勝者、優勝チーム、ウィナー(英語:Winner)などと呼ばれる。なお、優勝に準じた者・チームは準優勝と呼ぶ。
  • Yūshō (優勝, victory, championship) is the term for a championship in Japanese. This article focuses on championships in the sport of professional sumo.It is awarded in each of the six annual honbasho or official tournaments, to the wrestler who wins the most number of bouts. Yūshō are awarded in all six professional sumo divisions. The prize money for a top makuuchi division championship is currently 10 million yen, while for the lowest jonokuchi division the prize is 100,000 yen.Perhaps surprisingly, considering that most of the interest in tournaments today revolves around who will win the yūshō, the concept of a prize for a wrestler's individual performance is a relatively recent one. Legendary wrestlers such as Tanikaze and Raiden are credited today with winning many championships, but they are all unofficial and are really nothing more than a "best tournament record."The individual yūshō idea evolved gradually, from wrestlers simply picking up cash thrown into the ring by spectators after winning exciting matches (common in the Edo period), to wrestlers being given trophies and prizes from private sponsors for performances over an entire tournament (beginning in the Meiji period). Trophies were at first given only for undefeated records, but since draws, no decisions and absences were all possible outcomes, several wrestlers could be eligible and it did not necessarily go to the man with the most wins.In January 1900, the system recognised today began to take shape when the Osaka Mainichi Shinbun newspaper announced it would give a prize of a keshō-mawashi decorative apron for either an undefeated record or for the fewest losses, and in the event of a tie, the wrestler who had defeated the most high ranking opponents would win the prize. Thus the principle of an individual champion was established. Takamiyama Torinosuke's victory in June 1909 was the first to be officially declared a yūshō, and the system was formally recognised by the Japan Sumo Association in 1926 when the Tokyo and Osaka organisations merged.From June 1909 to October 1931 and from January 1940 to July 1947, there was also a group competition called Tōzai-sei (東西制). The wrestlers were divided into two teams, East and West, and it was the team with the better overall score that was awarded a prize.In addition to their prize money, top division yūshō winners receive the Emperor's cup (天皇賜杯, Tennō shihai), first donated by Hirohito, an avid sumo fan, in 1925 as the Prince Regent's cup (摂政宮賜杯, Sesshō-no-miya shihai). It was changed to current name upon Hirohito's accession to the emperor's throne in December 1926. There is also a banner with the names of past winners. Both are presented by the chairman of the Sumo Association. There are also a large number of prizes and trophies given by prefectural and foreign governments, as well as businesses. For several years the French President Jacques Chirac, a noted sumo fan, donated a trophy. The wrestler is given replicas of all the trophies to keep. In July 2010, and again in May 2011, neither the Emperor's Cup nor any other prizes were handed out, because of controversies over illegal betting and match-fixing respectively. However, in both cases the yūshō were still official and counted on the wrestlers' records.An unbeaten 15-0 score is known as zenshō-yūshō and is fairly rare; most yūshō winning scores are either 14-1 or 13-2. The wrestler who has won the most top division yūshō is Taihō with 32, closely followed by Chiyonofuji with 31. Futabayama won 12 yūshō in an era when only two tournaments were held each year.
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  • Un yūshō (優勝, yūshō?) désigne le gain d'un tournoi de sumo dans une des six divisions que comporte le sumo professionnel.Lors de chaque honbasho, le lutteur qui a le plus de victoires dans sa division à la fin du tournoi est déclaré vainqueur. En cas d'égalité de victoires à la fin de la dernière journée du tournoi (千秋楽, senshûraku?), un combat supplémentaire appelé kettei-sen (決定戦, kettei-sen?) est organisé entre les lutteurs ex-aequo.
  • 우승(優勝)은 스포츠 대회 등에서 주최자가 정한 규칙에 따라 우열을 경쟁하고 그 결과 몇몇 개인 또는 단체가 대회에 참가한 다른 누구보다도 우수하다고 인정받는 것을 말한다. 또한 우승하지 못해 2등을 한 것은 준우승(準優勝)이라고 한다.
  • 優勝(ゆうしょう)とは、スポーツの大会などにおいて、主催者が決めたルールにしたがって優劣を競い、その結果ある個人、もしくは団体が、大会に参加した他の誰よりも優れていると認めること。または、そう認められること。優勝したものは優勝者、優勝チーム、ウィナー(英語:Winner)などと呼ばれる。なお、優勝に準じた者・チームは準優勝と呼ぶ。
  • Yūshō (優勝, victory, championship) is the term for a championship in Japanese. This article focuses on championships in the sport of professional sumo.It is awarded in each of the six annual honbasho or official tournaments, to the wrestler who wins the most number of bouts. Yūshō are awarded in all six professional sumo divisions.
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  • Yūshō
  • Yūshō
  • 優勝
  • 우승
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