Les affaires du voile islamique sont les circonstances entourant le port du voile en public. Les conflits se cristallisent souvent autour des signes ostentatoires religieux dans le domaine public ; le voile en est l’exemple le plus symptomatique. Des lois récentes tentent de traiter plus précisément ce domaine. La réglementation s’élabore par petites touches, au fur et à mesure que se construit la jurisprudence dans les tribunaux.

PropertyValue
dbpedia-owl:abstract
  • Les affaires du voile islamique sont les circonstances entourant le port du voile en public. Les conflits se cristallisent souvent autour des signes ostentatoires religieux dans le domaine public ; le voile en est l’exemple le plus symptomatique. Des lois récentes tentent de traiter plus précisément ce domaine. La réglementation s’élabore par petites touches, au fur et à mesure que se construit la jurisprudence dans les tribunaux.
  • Islamic dress in Europe, especially the variety of headdresses worn by Muslim women, has become a prominent symbol of the presence of Islam in western Europe. In several countries the adherence to hijab (an Arabic noun meaning "to cover") has led to political controversies and proposals for a legal ban. Some countries already have laws banning the wearing of masks in public, which can be applied to veils that conceal the face. Other countries are debating similar legislation, or have more limited prohibitions. Some of them apply only to face-covering clothing such as the burqa, boushiya, or niqab; some apply to any clothing with an Islamic religious symbolism such as the khimar, a type of headscarf. The issue has different names in different countries, and "the veil" or "hijab" may be used as general terms for the debate, representing more than just the veil itself, or the concept of modesty embodied in hijab.Although the Balkans and Eastern Europe have indigenous Muslim populations, most Muslims in western Europe are members of immigrant communities. The issue of Islamic dress is linked with issues of immigration and the position of Islam in western society. In November 2006, European Commissioner Franco Frattini said that he did not favour a ban on the burqa. This is apparently the first official statement on the issue of prohibition of Islamic dress from the European Commission, the executive of the European Union. The reasons given for prohibition vary. Legal bans on face-covering clothing are often justified on security grounds, as an anti-terrorism measure.in 2006 British Prime Minister Tony Blair described it as a "mark of separation". Visible symbols of a non-Christian culture conflict with the national identity in European states, which assumes a shared culture. Proposals for a ban may be linked to other related cultural prohibitions: the Dutch politician Geert Wilders proposed a ban on hijabs, in Islamic schools, in new mosques, and in non-western immigration.In France and Turkey, the emphasis is on the secular nature of the state, and the symbolic nature of the Islamic dress, and bans apply at state institutions (courts, civil service) and in state-funded education. These bans also cover Islamic headscarves, which in some other countries are seen as less controversial, although law court staff in the Netherlands are also forbidden to wear Islamic headscarves on grounds of 'state neutrality'. An apparently less politicised argument is that in specific professions (teaching), a ban on "veils" (niqab) is justified, since face-to-face communication and eye contact is required. This argument has featured prominently in judgements in Britain and the Netherlands, after students or teachers were banned from wearing face-covering clothing. Public and political response to such prohibition proposals is complex, since by definition they mean that the government decides on individual clothing. Some non-Muslims, who would not be affected by a ban, see it as an issue of civil liberties, as a slippery slope leading to further restrictions on private life. A public opinion poll in London showed that 75 percent of Londoners support "the right of all persons to dress in accordance with their religious beliefs". In another poll in the United Kingdom by Ipsos MORI, 61 percent agreed that "Muslim women are segregating themselves" by wearing a veil, yet 77 percent thought they should have the right to wear it.
dbpedia-owl:thumbnail
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageExternalLink
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageID
  • 7645488 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageInterLanguageLink
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageLength
  • 23139 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 69 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 108649452 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink
prop-fr:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dcterms:subject
rdfs:comment
  • Les affaires du voile islamique sont les circonstances entourant le port du voile en public. Les conflits se cristallisent souvent autour des signes ostentatoires religieux dans le domaine public ; le voile en est l’exemple le plus symptomatique. Des lois récentes tentent de traiter plus précisément ce domaine. La réglementation s’élabore par petites touches, au fur et à mesure que se construit la jurisprudence dans les tribunaux.
  • Islamic dress in Europe, especially the variety of headdresses worn by Muslim women, has become a prominent symbol of the presence of Islam in western Europe. In several countries the adherence to hijab (an Arabic noun meaning "to cover") has led to political controversies and proposals for a legal ban. Some countries already have laws banning the wearing of masks in public, which can be applied to veils that conceal the face.
rdfs:label
  • Voile islamique en Europe
  • Islamic dress in Europe
owl:sameAs
http://www.w3.org/ns/prov#wasDerivedFrom
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is foaf:primaryTopic of