En linguistique, la théorie du liage peut désigner n'importe laquelle des membres du grand groupe de théories ayant pour objet la distribution des éléments pronominaux et anaphoriques. L'idée selon laquelle il devrait y avoir une théorie spécialisée et cohérente s'occupant de ces phénomènes particuliers est apparue dans les travaux autour des grammaires transformationnelles dans les années 1970.

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dbpedia-owl:abstract
  • En linguistique, la théorie du liage peut désigner n'importe laquelle des membres du grand groupe de théories ayant pour objet la distribution des éléments pronominaux et anaphoriques. L'idée selon laquelle il devrait y avoir une théorie spécialisée et cohérente s'occupant de ces phénomènes particuliers est apparue dans les travaux autour des grammaires transformationnelles dans les années 1970. Ces travaux culminèrent avec la théorie du gouvernement et du liage (en), une théorie générale de la structure linguistique innée dont la version de la théorie du liage est toujours considérée comme une référence, bien qu'elle ne soit plus d'actualité. La quasi-totalité des théories syntactiques génératives (telles que la HPSG et la grammaire lexicale-fonctionnelle) ont à présent une sous-partie s'occupant de la théorie du liage.
  • In linguistics, binding refers to the distribution of anaphoric elements (pronouns and other proforms). A pronoun (a "bindee") usually has an antecedent (a "binder") in context. The goal of binding theory is to identify the syntactic relationship that can or must hold between a given pronoun or noun and its antecedent (or postcedent), e.g. Johni said hei would help vs. *Hei said Johni would help. The idea that there should be a specialized, coherent theory dealing with this sort of phenomena originated in work in Transformational Grammar in the 1970s. This work culminated in Government and Binding Theory in the 1980s. The binding theory that became established at that time is still considered a reference point, though its validity is no longer accepted. Many theories of syntax now have a subtheory that addresses binding phenomena. These phenomena exist in all languages, although the behavior of binding can vary in interesting and nuanced ways across languages, even across languages that are closely related.
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  • 1981 (xsd:integer)
  • 1998 (xsd:integer)
  • 2005 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:auteur
  • Büring, D.
  • Chomsky, N.
prop-fr:auteurs
  • Heim, I., and A. Kratzer
  • Hornstein, N. Nunes, J. Grohmann, K.
prop-fr:codeDeLangue
  • en
prop-fr:format
  • poche
prop-fr:fr
  • théorie du gouvernement et du liage
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  • 978 (xsd:integer)
  • 0978-03-11 (xsd:date)
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  • en
prop-fr:langue
  • anglais
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  • 93005308 (xsd:integer)
  • 97011089 (xsd:integer)
  • 2003065437 (xsd:integer)
  • 2006295440 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:lienÉditeur
  • Cambridge University Press
prop-fr:lieu
  • Cambridge
  • Dordrecht
  • Malden, MA
  • Cambridge; New York
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  • 7 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:texteOriginal
  • Whom did Smoltz hit [e] with the baseball? Notice in the question , whom, which corresponds to the object of the verb hit, appears at the left of the sentence, not in the position marked [e], which is where the object appears in the statement. The position marked by [e] is linked to, , the question word whom. Whom is the operator, denoting a set of individuals, and the [e] spot is the variable, while the range of the operator is, in essence, limited to those people whom Smoltz might have hit . Notice that, since is a question, it would not be quite correct to say that whom and Rodriguez refer to the same thing, since it is also possible that John Smoltz hit other people as well. The names A-binding and A'-binding come from the idea of A-levels and A'-levels, which distinguish arguments from non-arguments, such as elements which may have been arguments, but have moved "beyond" to become something else in addition, such as a question word; also elements which are peripheral, such as certain kinds of modifiers. Thus, in the example above, Smoltz and Rodriguez are A-level elements, since they are arguments of the verb hit
  • Generative syntax distinguishes two kinds of binding. The first concerns nouns and the binding conditions discussed above: this is referred to as A-binding. The second concerns binding of another kind, a kind of logical binding known as operator-variable binding, or A'-binding. Operator-variable binding is the formal mechanism employed to explain the syntax of interrogatives , topicalization, as well as relative clauses, and other related language constructions. In essence, operator-variable binding provides a way for an individual entity to be picked out from a set of entities. Since this is a very abstract definition, an illustration will be helpful. Look at the two examples below. The first is a statement, and the second is a question derived from the statement. Smoltz hit Rodriguez with the baseball.
  • * Principles and parameters * Empty category principle * Control * Argument control * Raising * Trace * ECM verb * Tensed-S Condition
  • Heim and Kratzer distinguish between syntactic and semantic binding : A node α syntactically binds a node β if * α and β are co-indexed, * α c-commands β, * α is in an A-position, and * α does not c-command any other node which is also co-indexed with β, c-commands β, and is in an A-position . βn semantically binds αm if the sister of βn is the largest subtree of γ in which αm is semantically free, where * αm is a variable occurrence in a tree γ, * βn is a variable binder occurrence in γ
prop-fr:titre
  • Binding Theory
  • Lectures on Government and Binding
  • Semantics in Generative Grammar
  • Understanding Minimalism
prop-fr:trad
  • government and binding theory
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prop-fr:éditeur
  • Blackwell
  • Cambridge University Press
  • Foris Publications
dcterms:subject
rdfs:comment
  • En linguistique, la théorie du liage peut désigner n'importe laquelle des membres du grand groupe de théories ayant pour objet la distribution des éléments pronominaux et anaphoriques. L'idée selon laquelle il devrait y avoir une théorie spécialisée et cohérente s'occupant de ces phénomènes particuliers est apparue dans les travaux autour des grammaires transformationnelles dans les années 1970.
  • In linguistics, binding refers to the distribution of anaphoric elements (pronouns and other proforms). A pronoun (a "bindee") usually has an antecedent (a "binder") in context. The goal of binding theory is to identify the syntactic relationship that can or must hold between a given pronoun or noun and its antecedent (or postcedent), e.g. Johni said hei would help vs. *Hei said Johni would help.
rdfs:label
  • Théorie du liage
  • Binding (linguistics)
  • Teoria da ligação
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