Simon Joseph Théodore Jouffroy, né aux Pontets (Doubs) le 6 juillet 1796 et mort à Paris le 4 février 1842 à l'âge de 45 ans, est un philosophe et homme politique français. Il développe au début du XIXe siècle la question psychologique au sein de l'école éclectique française dirigée par Victor Cousin. Il épouse le 13 août 1833 Marie Mourcet, dont il a deux enfants : Charles et Marie, épouse du romancier Paul Perret.

PropertyValue
dbpedia-owl:abstract
  • Simon Joseph Théodore Jouffroy, né aux Pontets (Doubs) le 6 juillet 1796 et mort à Paris le 4 février 1842 à l'âge de 45 ans, est un philosophe et homme politique français. Il développe au début du XIXe siècle la question psychologique au sein de l'école éclectique française dirigée par Victor Cousin. Il épouse le 13 août 1833 Marie Mourcet, dont il a deux enfants : Charles et Marie, épouse du romancier Paul Perret. Selon Alain Jouffroy, Théodore Jouffroy « a écrit un texte fantastique qui s'appelle Comment les dogmes finissent. C'est-à-dire comment une croyance humaine, quelle qu'elle soit, prolifère, se répand, se partage, se confond avec un parti ou avec une église, devient dominante, dogmatique, exterminatrice, et périclite pour faire place à une autre croyance et ça recommence. » Il fut député de Pontarlier.
  • Théodore-Simon Jouffroy (Pontets, 1796 – Parigi, 1842) è stato un filosofo francese.Esponente della corrente spiritualistica di Victor Cousin, fu autore (1833) di un Cours de droit naturel.
  • Théodore Simon Jouffroy (6 July 1796 – 4 February 1842) was a French philosopher.He was born at Les Pontets, Franche-Comté, département of Doubs. In his tenth year, his father, a tax-gatherer, sent him to an uncle at Pontarlier, under whom he began his classical studies. At Dijon his compositions attracted the attention of an inspector, who had him placed (1814) in the normal school, Paris. There he came under the influence of Victor Cousin, and in 1817 he was appointed assistant professor of philosophy at the normal and Bourbon schools.Three years later, being thrown upon his own resources, he began a course of lectures in his own house, and formed literary connexions with Le Courrier français, Le Globe, L'Encyclopédie moderne, and La Revue européenne. The variety of his pursuits at this time carried him over the whole field of ancient and modern literature. But he was chiefly attracted to the philosophical system represented by Thomas Reid and Dugald Stewart. The application of "common sense" to the problem of substance supplied a more satisfactory analytic for him than the scepticism of David Hume which reached him through a study of Kant.He thus threw in his lot with the Scottish philosophy, and his first dissertations are adaptations from Reid's Inquiry. In 1826 he wrote a preface to a translation of Stewart's Moral Philosophy, demonstrating the possibility of a scientific statement of the laws of consciousness; in 1828 he began a translation of the works of Reid, and in his preface estimated the influence of Scottish criticism upon philosophy, giving a biographical account of the movement from Francis Hutcheson onwards. In the following year he was returned to parlement by the arrondissement of Pontarlier; but the work of legislation was ill-suited to him. Yet he attended to his duties conscientiously, and ultimately broke his health in their discharge. In 1833 he was appointed professor of Greek and Roman philosophy at the college of France and a member of the Academy of Sciences; he then published the Mélanges philosophiques (4th ed. 1866; Eng. trans. G Ripley, Boston, 1835 and 1838), a collection of fugitive papers in criticism and philosophy and history. In them is foreshadowed all that he afterwards worked out in metaphysics, psychology, ethics and aesthetics.He had already demonstrated, in his prefaces, the possibility of a psychology apart from physiology, of a science of the phenomena of consciousness distinct from the perceptions of sense. He now classified the mental faculties, premising that they must not be confounded with capacities or properties of mind. They were, according to his analysis, personal will, primitive instincts, voluntary movement, natural and artificial signs, sensibility and the faculties of intellect; on this analytic he founded his scheme of the universe.In 1835 he published Cours de droit naturel (4th ed. 1866), one of his most important works. From the conception of a universal order in the universe he reasons to a Supreme Being, who has created it and who has conferred upon every man in harmony with it the aim of his existence, leading to his highest good. Good, he says, is the fulfilment of man's destiny, evil the thwarting of it. Every man being organized in a particular way has, of necessity, an aim, the fulfilment of which is good; and he has faculties for accomplishing it, directed by reason. The aim is good, however, only when reason guides it for the benefit of the majority, but that is not absolute good. When reason rises to the conception of universal order, when actions are submitted, by the exercise of a sympathy working necessarily and intuitively to the idea of the universal order, the good has been reached, the true good, good in itself, absolute good. But he does not follow his idea into the details of human duty, though he passes in review fatalism, mysticism, pantheism, scepticism, egotism, sentimentalism and rationalism.In 1835 Jouffroy's health failed and he went to Italy, where he continued to translate the Scottish philosophers. On his return he became librarian to the university, and took the chair of recent philosophy at the faculty of letters. He died in Paris. After his death were published Nouveaux mélanges philosophiques (3rd ed. 1872) and Cours d'esthetique (3rd ed. 1875). The former contributed nothing new to the system except a more emphatic statement of the distinction between psychology and physiology. The latter formulated his theory of beauty.Jouffroy's claim to distinction rests mainly on his ability as an expositor of other men's ideas. His enthusiasm, and his command over the language of popular exposition, made him a great international medium for the transfusion of ideas. He stood between Scotland and France and Germany and France; and, though his expositions are vitiated by loose reading of the philosophers he interpreted, he did some memorable work.
  • Théodore Simon Jouffroy (Pontets Doubs, 16 de Julho de 1796 — Paris, 4 de Fevereiro de 1842) foi um filósofo francês.Filho de um preceptor, recebeu educação muito religiosa, mas desde a juventude foi influenciado pela leitura de Rousseau e Voltaire. Mais tarde, na Escola Normal, atravessoou uma crise espiritual da qual deixou um relato. Voltou-se então contra as antigas crenças e publicou no Le Globe, um artigo que se tornou célebre: Como terminam os dogmas. Foi professor da Faculdade de Letras e depois do Colégio de França.No pensamento filosófico de Jouffroy a idéia central é de que há necessidade de se descobrir verdades morais, políticas e religiosas que tinham sido anteriormente sufocadas pelos dogmas. Espiritualista à maneira de Victor Cousin, foi também influenciado pela filosofia escocesa, chegando mesmo a traduzir algumas obras, como as Obras completas de Thomas Reid. Como os escoceses, Jouffroy tendia a reduzir a filosofia à psicologia. Em seu Curso de estética, percebe-se a influência de Kant.
  • Théodore Simon Jouffroy (* 6. Juli 1796 in Les Pontets, Franche-Comté; † 4. Februar 1842 in Paris) war ein französischer Publizist und Philosoph.Jouffroy widmete sich auf der École normale supérieure in Paris unter Victor Cousins Leitung dem Studium der Philosophie und erhielt nach der Julirevolution eine Anstellung an der genannten Anstalt als Lehrer der Philosophie. 1832 wurde er am Collège de France Nachfolger Thurots, welche Stelle er 1837 wieder niederlegte, und 1833 Mitglied der Académie des sciences morales et politiques.Als Victor Cousin Bildungsminister wurde, ernannte er Jouffroy zum Mitglied des Universitätsrats. Als Abgeordneter von Pontarlier (seit 1831) gehörte er zu den Doktrinären, deren Journal Le Globe er schon 1824 gründen half. Als Schüler Cousins hat er besonders die schottische Philosophie berücksichtigt. Er veröffentlichte eine französische Bearbeitung der Outlines of moral philosophy von Dugald Stewart (Paris 1826, 3. Aufl. 1841) und der sämtlichen Werke von Thomas Reid (Paris 1836, 6 Bde.), beide mit vorzüglichen Einleitungen; außerdem Mélanges philosophiques (Paris 1833, 5. Aufl. 1875; neue Folge 1842, 4. Aufl. 1883), eine Auswahl der wichtigsten Artikel, welche von ihm im Globe erschienen waren. Von seinen an der Sorbonne gehaltenen Vorlesungen erschienen der Cours de droit naturel (Paris 1833–42, 4. Aufl. 1866) und Cours d'esthétique (nach seinem Tod von Jean Philibert Damiron herausgegeben, 4. Aufl. 1883) im Druck.
dbpedia-owl:birthDate
  • 1796-07-06 (xsd:date)
dbpedia-owl:deathDate
  • 1842-02-04 (xsd:date)
dbpedia-owl:residence
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageExternalLink
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageID
  • 1704436 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageLength
  • 11347 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 64 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 106557824 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink
prop-fr:dateDeDécès
  • 1842-02-04 (xsd:date)
prop-fr:dateDeNaissance
  • 1796-07-06 (xsd:date)
prop-fr:fonction
  • Parlementaire français
  • Député
prop-fr:gouvernement
prop-fr:jusqu'auFonction
  • 1842 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:nom
  • Théodore Jouffroy
prop-fr:résidence
prop-fr:wikiPageUsesTemplate
prop-fr:àPartirDuFonction
  • 1831 (xsd:integer)
dcterms:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Simon Joseph Théodore Jouffroy, né aux Pontets (Doubs) le 6 juillet 1796 et mort à Paris le 4 février 1842 à l'âge de 45 ans, est un philosophe et homme politique français. Il développe au début du XIXe siècle la question psychologique au sein de l'école éclectique française dirigée par Victor Cousin. Il épouse le 13 août 1833 Marie Mourcet, dont il a deux enfants : Charles et Marie, épouse du romancier Paul Perret.
  • Théodore-Simon Jouffroy (Pontets, 1796 – Parigi, 1842) è stato un filosofo francese.Esponente della corrente spiritualistica di Victor Cousin, fu autore (1833) di un Cours de droit naturel.
  • Théodore Simon Jouffroy (Pontets Doubs, 16 de Julho de 1796 — Paris, 4 de Fevereiro de 1842) foi um filósofo francês.Filho de um preceptor, recebeu educação muito religiosa, mas desde a juventude foi influenciado pela leitura de Rousseau e Voltaire. Mais tarde, na Escola Normal, atravessoou uma crise espiritual da qual deixou um relato. Voltou-se então contra as antigas crenças e publicou no Le Globe, um artigo que se tornou célebre: Como terminam os dogmas.
  • Théodore Simon Jouffroy (* 6. Juli 1796 in Les Pontets, Franche-Comté; † 4. Februar 1842 in Paris) war ein französischer Publizist und Philosoph.Jouffroy widmete sich auf der École normale supérieure in Paris unter Victor Cousins Leitung dem Studium der Philosophie und erhielt nach der Julirevolution eine Anstellung an der genannten Anstalt als Lehrer der Philosophie.
  • Théodore Simon Jouffroy (6 July 1796 – 4 February 1842) was a French philosopher.He was born at Les Pontets, Franche-Comté, département of Doubs. In his tenth year, his father, a tax-gatherer, sent him to an uncle at Pontarlier, under whom he began his classical studies. At Dijon his compositions attracted the attention of an inspector, who had him placed (1814) in the normal school, Paris.
rdfs:label
  • Théodore Simon Jouffroy
  • Théodore Simon Jouffroy
  • Théodore Simon Jouffroy
  • Théodore Simon Jouffroy
  • Théodore-Simon Jouffroy
owl:sameAs
http://www.w3.org/ns/prov#wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Théodore Jouffroy
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink of
is foaf:primaryTopic of