Le septénaire trochaïque est un vers recitatif des comédies avec accompagnement de flûte, utilisé dans la poésie antique. Il doit son nom au fait qu'il comporte sept trochées suivis d'une syllabe indifférente, l'avant-dernier pied étant obligatoirement pur. Ce vers est très souvent employé par Plaute et Térence.↑ Marius Lavency, VSVS : Grammaire latine (lire en ligne), p. 480.

PropertyValue
dbpedia-owl:abstract
  • Le septénaire trochaïque est un vers recitatif des comédies avec accompagnement de flûte, utilisé dans la poésie antique. Il doit son nom au fait qu'il comporte sept trochées suivis d'une syllabe indifférente, l'avant-dernier pied étant obligatoirement pur. Ce vers est très souvent employé par Plaute et Térence.
  • In ancient Greek and Latin literature, the trochaic septenarius is one of two major forms of poetic metre based on the trochee as its dominant rhythmic unit, the other being trochaic octonarius. It is used in drama and less often in poetry.The trochaic septenarius is a catalectic line; that is, it consists of eight trochaic feet, with the last a half-foot. Only the seventh foot is regularly trochaic. The other feet can be varied with a spondee, dactyl, tribrach, or more rarely an anapaest. There is usually a diaeresis after the fourth foot. It is sometimes called catalectic trochaic tetrameter.An example can be found in the Pervigilium Veneris ("Vigil of Venus");Crās ǎ|mēt quī| nūnqu(am) ǎ|māvīt,| quīqu(e) ǎ|māvīt| crās ǎ|mēt.Let him love tomorrow who has never loved, and let him who has loved love tomorrow.The trochaic septenarius is the only trochaic meter used in the dialogue portions of Latin plays (as distinguished from the cantica or sung portions), and was the favorite meter of Plautus. Its most famous singular use in Latin literature is possibly the ribald versus quadratus sung by the soldiers at the Gallic triumph of Julius Caesar.Trochaic septenarius is used in the abecedarian Latin hymn Audite Omnes Amantes ("Hear ye, All Lovers"), believed to have been written by Saint Secundinus.An equivalent form is also found in English verse, as for instance in Tennyson's Locksley Hall.
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageID
  • 6103735 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageLength
  • 1609 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 13 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 105032732 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink
prop-fr:année
  • 1999 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:auteur
  • Jean Soubiran
prop-fr:isbn
  • 978 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:lang
  • fr
prop-fr:pagesTotales
  • 504 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:titre
  • Essai sur la versification dramatique des Romains : sénaire iambique et septénaire trochaïque
prop-fr:wikiPageUsesTemplate
prop-fr:éditeur
  • CNRS Editions
dcterms:subject
rdfs:comment
  • Le septénaire trochaïque est un vers recitatif des comédies avec accompagnement de flûte, utilisé dans la poésie antique. Il doit son nom au fait qu'il comporte sept trochées suivis d'une syllabe indifférente, l'avant-dernier pied étant obligatoirement pur. Ce vers est très souvent employé par Plaute et Térence.↑ Marius Lavency, VSVS : Grammaire latine (lire en ligne), p. 480.
  • In ancient Greek and Latin literature, the trochaic septenarius is one of two major forms of poetic metre based on the trochee as its dominant rhythmic unit, the other being trochaic octonarius. It is used in drama and less often in poetry.The trochaic septenarius is a catalectic line; that is, it consists of eight trochaic feet, with the last a half-foot. Only the seventh foot is regularly trochaic. The other feet can be varied with a spondee, dactyl, tribrach, or more rarely an anapaest.
rdfs:label
  • Septénaire trochaïque
  • Trochaic septenarius
owl:sameAs
http://www.w3.org/ns/prov#wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink of
is foaf:primaryTopic of