PropertyValue
dbpedia-owl:abstract
  • L'Union européenne autorise la mise sur le marché d'un organisme génétiquement modifié selon les critères définis par la directive communautaire 2001/18/CE, relative à la dissémination volontaire d'organismes génétiquement modifiés dans l'environnement.En 2012, La Commission européenne a rouvert le débat sur la « coexistence entre les OGM et l'agriculture biologique », question essentielle pour la viabilité de l'agriculture biologique à long terme.En 2013, selon l'Agence France-Presse, le maïs génétiquement modifié MON 810 est le seul cultivé dans l'Union européenne (essentiellement en Espagne et au Portugal),. En revanche, une cinquantaine d'OGM sont autorisés dans l'alimentation animale et humaine dans l'Union européenne,.
  • The European Union (EU) may have the most stringent GMO regulations in the world. All GMOs, along with irradiated food, are considered "new food" and are subject to extensive, case-by-case, science-based food evaluation by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The EFSA reports to the European Commission, which then drafts proposals for granting or refusing authorisation. Each proposal is submitted to the Section on GM Food and Feed of the Standing Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health. If accepted, it is either adopted by the EC or passed on to the Council of Agricultural Ministers. The Council has three months to reach a qualified majority for or against the proposal. If no majority is reached, the proposal is passed back to the EC, which then adopts the proposal.As of August 2012, the European Union had authorised 48 GMOs. Most of these were for animal feed imports or for feed and food processing. There is also a safeguard clause that Member States may invoke to temporarily restrict or prohibit the use and/or sale of a GMO within their territory if they have justifiable reasons to consider that the approved GMO constitutes a risk to human health or the environment. The EC is obliged to investigate these cases and either overturn the original registrations or ask the country to withdraw its temporary restriction. By 2012, seven countries had submitted safeguard clauses. The EC investigated and rejected those from six countries ("...the scientific evidence currently available did not invalidate the original risk assessments for the products in question...") and one (the UK) withdrew.In 2010 Austria, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Slovenia and the Netherlands wrote a joint paper requesting that individual countries should have the right to decide whether to cultivate GM crops. By the year 2010, the only GMO food crop with approval for cultivation in Europe is MON 810, a Bt expressing maize conferring resistance to the European corn borer that gained approval in 1998. On 2 March 2010 a second GMO, a potato called Amflora, was approved for cultivation for industrial applications in the EU by the European Commission and was grown in Germany, Sweden and the Czech Republic that year. Gene flow will occur between related crops and the EC issued new guidelines in 2010 regarding the co-existence of GM and non-GM crops.Co-existence is regulated by the use of buffer zones and isolation distances between the GM and non-GM crops. The guidelines are not binding and each Member State can implement its own regulations, which has resulted in buffer zones ranging from 15 metres (Sweden) to 800 metres (Luxembourg). Member States may also designate GM-free zones, effectively allowing them to ban cultivation of GM crops in their territory without invoking a safeguard clause.The regulations concerning the import and sale of GMOs for human and animal consumption grown outside the EU involve providing freedom of choice to the farmers and consumers. All food (including processed food) or feed which contains greater than 0.9% of approved GMOs must be labelled. Twice GMOs unapproved by the EC have arrived in the EU and been forced to return to their port of origin. The first was in 2006 when a shipment of rice from America containing an experimental GMO variety (LLRice601) not meant for commercialisation arrived at Rotterdam. The second in 2009 when trace amounts of a GMO maize approved in the US were found in a "non-GM" soy flour cargo. It was reported in 2012 that the EU imports about 30 million tons a year of GM crops for animal consumption.
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageID
  • 938775 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageLength
  • 25593 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 164 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 110837768 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink
prop-fr:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dcterms:subject
rdfs:comment
  • L'Union européenne autorise la mise sur le marché d'un organisme génétiquement modifié selon les critères définis par la directive communautaire 2001/18/CE, relative à la dissémination volontaire d'organismes génétiquement modifiés dans l'environnement.En 2012, La Commission européenne a rouvert le débat sur la « coexistence entre les OGM et l'agriculture biologique », question essentielle pour la viabilité de l'agriculture biologique à long terme.En 2013, selon l'Agence France-Presse, le maïs génétiquement modifié MON 810 est le seul cultivé dans l'Union européenne (essentiellement en Espagne et au Portugal),.
  • The European Union (EU) may have the most stringent GMO regulations in the world. All GMOs, along with irradiated food, are considered "new food" and are subject to extensive, case-by-case, science-based food evaluation by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The EFSA reports to the European Commission, which then drafts proposals for granting or refusing authorisation.
rdfs:label
  • Réglementation des OGM dans l'Union européenne
  • Regulation of genetically modified organisms in the European Union
owl:sameAs
http://www.w3.org/ns/prov#wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink of
is foaf:primaryTopic of