Le mot jobelin servait au départ à désigner des individus jugés « fous » ou « niais ». Ce n'est que dans la seconde moitié du XVe siècle qu'il est attesté avec le sens « Baragouin, jargon, argot, langage à l’aide duquel on attrape les jobards », selon la définition donnée par Francisque-Michel en 1856.↑ Études de philologie comparée sur l'argot.

PropertyValue
dbpedia-owl:abstract
  • Le mot jobelin servait au départ à désigner des individus jugés « fous » ou « niais ». Ce n'est que dans la seconde moitié du XVe siècle qu'il est attesté avec le sens « Baragouin, jargon, argot, langage à l’aide duquel on attrape les jobards », selon la définition donnée par Francisque-Michel en 1856.
  • Thieves' cant or Rogues' cant, also known as peddler's French, was a secret language (a cant or cryptolect) which was formerly used by thieves, beggars and hustlers of various kinds in Great Britain and to a lesser extent in other English-speaking countries. The classic, colourful argot is now mostly obsolete, and is largely relegated to the realm of literature and fantasy role-playing, although individual terms continue to be used in the criminal subcultures of both Britain and the U.S. Its South German and Swiss equivalent is the Rotwelsch and Serbo-Croatian equivalent is Šatrovački.
dbpedia-owl:thumbnail
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageID
  • 5784204 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageLength
  • 12793 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 34 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 109892837 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink
prop-fr:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dcterms:subject
rdfs:comment
  • Le mot jobelin servait au départ à désigner des individus jugés « fous » ou « niais ». Ce n'est que dans la seconde moitié du XVe siècle qu'il est attesté avec le sens « Baragouin, jargon, argot, langage à l’aide duquel on attrape les jobards », selon la définition donnée par Francisque-Michel en 1856.↑ Études de philologie comparée sur l'argot.
  • Thieves' cant or Rogues' cant, also known as peddler's French, was a secret language (a cant or cryptolect) which was formerly used by thieves, beggars and hustlers of various kinds in Great Britain and to a lesser extent in other English-speaking countries. The classic, colourful argot is now mostly obsolete, and is largely relegated to the realm of literature and fantasy role-playing, although individual terms continue to be used in the criminal subcultures of both Britain and the U.S.
rdfs:label
  • Jobelin
  • Thieves' cant
owl:sameAs
http://www.w3.org/ns/prov#wasDerivedFrom
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink of
is foaf:primaryTopic of