L’Ibis est un libelle du poète latin Ovide, écrit durant ses années d’exil à Tomis sur les bords de la Mer Noire. C’est « un flot continu d'insultes graves mais érudites », dans la veine du poème de même titre de l’auteur alexandrin Callimaque.↑ D’après Oliver Taplin, Literature in the Greek and Roman Worlds: A New Perspective, Oxford University Press,‎ 2000, p. 437

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  • L’Ibis est un libelle du poète latin Ovide, écrit durant ses années d’exil à Tomis sur les bords de la Mer Noire. C’est « un flot continu d'insultes graves mais érudites », dans la veine du poème de même titre de l’auteur alexandrin Callimaque.
  • Ibis is a curse poem by the Latin poet Ovid, written during his years in exile across the Black Sea for an offense against Augustus. It is "a stream of violent but extremely learned abuse," modeled on a poem of the same title by the Alexandrian poet Callimachus.The object of this verbal assault is left unnamed except for the pseudonym Ibis, and no scholarly consensus exists as to whom the poet was directing his spleen. Titus Labienus, Caninius Rebilus, and Ovid's erstwhile friend Sabinus have been proposed, but such a wildly exaggerated figure as "Ibis" may have been a composite.The 644-line poem, like all Ovid's extant work except the Metamorphoses, is written in elegiac couplets. It is thus an unusual, though not unique, example of invective poetry in antiquity written in elegiac form rather than the more common iambics or hendecasyllabics. The incantatory nature of the curses in the Ibis has sometimes led to comparisons with curse tablets (defixiones), though Ovid's are elaborately literary in expression.Drawing on the encyclopedic store of knowledge he demonstrated in the Metamorphoses and his other work — from memory, as he had few books with him in exile — Ovid threatens his enemy with a veritable catalogue of "gruesome and mutually incompatible fates" that befell various figures from myth and history, including a Thyestean banquet of human flesh. He declares that even if he dies in exile, his ghost will rise and rend Ibis's flesh.The Ibis attracted a large number of scholia, and was widely disseminated and referenced in Renaissance literature. In his annotated translation (1577), Thomas Underdowne found in Ibis a reference guide to "all manner of vices punished, all offences corrected, and all misdeedes reuenged." An English translator noted that "a full reference to each of the allusions to be found in this poem would suffice to fill a small volume."
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  • 1894 (xsd:integer)
  • 1968 (xsd:integer)
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  • Ettore Paratore
  • Friedrich Marx
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  • de
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  • Florence
  • Stuttgart
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  • 2 (xsd:integer)
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  • 765 (xsd:integer)
  • 2391 (xsd:integer)
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  • Storia della letteratura latina
  • Paulys Realencyclopädie der classischen Altertumswissenschaft
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  • I
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  • Invective de Cicéron contre Salluste
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  • Invective de Cicéron contre Salluste
  • Invective de Cicéron contre Salluste
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  • Georg Wissowa
  • éd. Sansoni
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  • L’Ibis est un libelle du poète latin Ovide, écrit durant ses années d’exil à Tomis sur les bords de la Mer Noire. C’est « un flot continu d'insultes graves mais érudites », dans la veine du poème de même titre de l’auteur alexandrin Callimaque.↑ D’après Oliver Taplin, Literature in the Greek and Roman Worlds: A New Perspective, Oxford University Press,‎ 2000, p. 437
  • Ibis is a curse poem by the Latin poet Ovid, written during his years in exile across the Black Sea for an offense against Augustus. It is "a stream of violent but extremely learned abuse," modeled on a poem of the same title by the Alexandrian poet Callimachus.The object of this verbal assault is left unnamed except for the pseudonym Ibis, and no scholarly consensus exists as to whom the poet was directing his spleen.
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  • Ibis (Ovide)
  • Ibis (Ovid)
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