Everett Cherrington Hughes (1897-1983) est l'un des principaux représentants de la pensée sociologique de l'école de Chicago, courant de pensée sociologique apparu au début du XXe siècle aux États-Unis. Hughes et Herbert Blumer ont contribué à la seconde période de l'École de Chicago, soit celle qui suit directement les recherches et enseignements de Robert Ezra Park, Ernest Burgess, W.I. Thomas et F. Znaniecki ainsi que dans une autre mesure Albion Small et George Herbert Mead.

PropertyValue
dbpedia-owl:abstract
  • Everett Cherrington Hughes (1897-1983) est l'un des principaux représentants de la pensée sociologique de l'école de Chicago, courant de pensée sociologique apparu au début du XXe siècle aux États-Unis. Hughes et Herbert Blumer ont contribué à la seconde période de l'École de Chicago, soit celle qui suit directement les recherches et enseignements de Robert Ezra Park, Ernest Burgess, W.I. Thomas et F. Znaniecki ainsi que dans une autre mesure Albion Small et George Herbert Mead. Erving Goffman et Howard Becker ont été ses élèves. Tout comme William Lloyd Warner, Hughes était considéré comme un sociologue qui alliait autant études empiriques et réflexions théoriques. Entre 1927 et 1938, Hughes enseigne la sociologie à l'Université McGill à Montréal. Il profitera de son séjour à Montréal pour étudier la société canadienne-française. Il collabore avec Georges-Henri Lévesque et publie en 1943 un ouvrage qui porte sur la ville de Drummondville dans l'est de la province de Québec. Cet ouvrage intitulé French Canada in Transition aborde la question de l'industrialisation des régions rurales. Mais Everett C. Hughes est également connu pour ses recherches sur le travail. Le travail pour Hughes est un objet de la plus haute importance puisqu'il permet d'étudier les relations entre les individus. En effet, étudier le travail, c'est étudier les arrangements sociaux et psycho-sociaux. Le travail et son environnement sont un terrain intéressant puisqu'il permet d'examiner les processus d'acceptation, de tolérance et de valorisation face aux autres. Pour Hughes, les statuts ne sont pas définis a priori, ils naissent de l'interaction des acteurs qui ont des rôles sociaux différents. Afin de comprendre la division du travail, Hughes propose de dégager différentes notions que sont : la profession, les métiers, le "sale boulot" (expression dirty work créée en 1962 dans Good People and Dirty Work, article publié dans Social Problems, vol. X, Summer, 1962), la licence et le mandat. Hughes part du principe selon lequel un travail est composé d'activités honorables et moins honorables ; ces dernières sont nommées "sale boulot". Au cours des interactions, les individus chercheront sans cesse à déléguer à d'autres leur part de "sale boulot". Dans un secteur professionnel donné, on pourra dès lors distinguer une profession et des métiers en fonction du degré de "sale boulot" qu'ils contiennent. La profession est une activité qui nécessite de hautes qualifications, mais qui a également été l'objet d'un travail intense, de la part des individus, visant à déléguer à d'autres la part de "sale boulot" lui incombant, accroissant ainsi son honorabilité ; on peut dire que le métier est l'activité professionnelle la plus prestigieuse au sein d'un secteur particulier. Les métiers se situent à la périphérie de la profession et cherchent à leur tour, à se rejeter mutuellement le "sale boulot". Les métiers se livrent une lutte afin de se rapprocher le plus possible de la profession ; car plus l'activité pratiquée par le métier est proche de celle de la profession, plus l'aura honorable de cette dernière se projette sur la sienne. Hughes propose ensuite d'introduire la notion de licence ; elle est l'apanage des professions, ce sont des titres qui viennent légitimer la profession aux yeux du groupe social. Cette licence est un ensemble d'activités exclusives à la profession (actes notariés par exemple), le droit d'accomplir des tâches dangereuses (les chirurgiens par exemple) et le droit d'exclure un tiers de la profession. Les détenteurs d'une licence vont revendiquer le droit à exercer un mandat, c'est-à-dire le contrôle du contenu de son travail, mais également de celui des métiers.
  • Everett Cherrington Hughes (November 30, 1897, Beaver, Ohio – January 4, 1983, Cambridge, Massachusetts) was an American sociologist best known for his work on ethnic relations, work and occupations and the methodology of fieldwork. His take on sociology was, however, very broad. In recent scholarship, his theoretical contribution to sociology has been discussed as interpretive institutional ecology, forming a theoretical frame of reference that combines elements of the classical ecological theory of class (human ecology, functionalism, Georg Simmel, aspects of a Max Weber-inspired analysis of class, status and political power), and elements of a proto-dependency analysis of Quebec's industrialization in the 1930s (Helmes-Hayes 2000). The efforts to look for a broader theoretical framework in Hughes's work have also been criticized as anachronistic search for coherent theoretical core when Hughes is more easily associated with a methodological orientation (Chapoulie 1996, see also Helmes-Hayes 1998, 2000 on critiques of his attempts to analyze Hughes's theoretical contribution). Hughes's pathbreaking contribution to the development of fieldwork as a sociological method is, however, unquestionable (see Chapoulie 2002).Hughes is often discussed only in relation to his contribution to the Chicago school. Therefore it is seldom noted that he was one of the early contributors to the sociological analysis of Nazi Germany. Two classical essays, "Good People and Dirty Work" and "The Gleichschaltung of the German Statistical Yearbook: A Case in Professional Political Neutrality" witness of his lifelong commitment in sociology as a humanistic enterprise. In his preface to a collection of his papers entitled The Sociological Eye Hughes writes I heard the Brown Shirts in the streets of Nuremberg in 1930 singing, "The German youth is never so happy as when Jewish blood spurts from his knife;" I wrote "Good People and Dirty Work" and used it as a special lecture at McGill University where in the 1930s I taught a course on Social Movements that came to be known as "Hughes on the Nazis." (Hughes 1984, xv).Hughes's essays reflect his insight into German society, the developments of which he keenly followed during a long time. He spent a year there 1930–1931 when he was preparing a study on the Catholic labour movement (Chapoulie 1996, 14) and returned after the war for visits together with a delegation of U.S. scholars. He was fluent in German. He also had a keen interest in Canadian society, where his fluent knowledge of French language allowed him to develop ties to French-speaking sociology in Canada and support its development (Chapoulie 1996, Helmes-Hayes 2000). Hughes's sociological prose is original in its avoidance of complex concepts. He never published explicitly theoretical work. However, his essays are analytically dense and he often discusses the task of sociology more broadly. In his preface for The Sociological Eye, first published in 1971 (transaction edition published in 1984), he describes his approach to sociology with reference to C. Wright Mills's phrase the sociological imagination (Hughes 1984, xvi). In his final paragraphs to that preface he outlines his view of sociology and sociological method:Some say that sociology is a normative science. If they mean that social norms are one of its main objects of study, I agree. If they mean anything else, I do not agree. Many branches of human learning have suffered from taking norms too seriously. Departments of language in universities are often so normative that they kill and pin up their delicate moth of poetry and stuff their beasts of powerful living profes before letting students examine them. Language, as living communication, is one of the promising fields of study; it is not quite the same as the study of languages. Men constantly make and break norms; there is never a moment when the norms are fixed and unchanging. If they do appear to remain unchanged for some time in some place, that, too, is to be accounted for as much as change itself.Certainly, I have never sat down to write systematically about how to study society. I am suspicious of any method said to be the one and only. But among the methods I should recommend is the intensive, penetrating look with an imagination as lively and as sociological as it can be made. One of my basic assumptions is that if one quite clearly sees something happen once, it is almost certain to have happened again and again. The burden of proof is on those who claim a thing once seen is an exception; if they look hard, they may find it everywhere, although with some interesting differences in each case. (Hughes 1984, xviii-xix).
  • Everett Cherrington Hughes (* 30. November 1897 in Beaver, Ohio, USA; † 4. Januar 1983 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA) war ein US-amerikanischer Soziologe. Hughes war seit 1927 mit Helen McGill Huges verheiratet, mit der er zwei Töchter hatte.
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageID
  • 467222 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageLength
  • 5176 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 34 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 110534702 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink
prop-fr:dateDeDécès
  • 1983 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:dateDeNaissance
  • 1897 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:nom
  • Everett Cherrington Hughes
prop-fr:profession
  • Sociologue
prop-fr:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dcterms:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Everett Cherrington Hughes (1897-1983) est l'un des principaux représentants de la pensée sociologique de l'école de Chicago, courant de pensée sociologique apparu au début du XXe siècle aux États-Unis. Hughes et Herbert Blumer ont contribué à la seconde période de l'École de Chicago, soit celle qui suit directement les recherches et enseignements de Robert Ezra Park, Ernest Burgess, W.I. Thomas et F. Znaniecki ainsi que dans une autre mesure Albion Small et George Herbert Mead.
  • Everett Cherrington Hughes (* 30. November 1897 in Beaver, Ohio, USA; † 4. Januar 1983 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA) war ein US-amerikanischer Soziologe. Hughes war seit 1927 mit Helen McGill Huges verheiratet, mit der er zwei Töchter hatte.
  • Everett Cherrington Hughes (November 30, 1897, Beaver, Ohio – January 4, 1983, Cambridge, Massachusetts) was an American sociologist best known for his work on ethnic relations, work and occupations and the methodology of fieldwork. His take on sociology was, however, very broad.
rdfs:label
  • Everett Hughes
  • Everett Cherrington Hughes
  • Everett Hughes (sociologist)
owl:sameAs
http://www.w3.org/ns/prov#wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Everett Cherrington Hughes
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink of
is foaf:primaryTopic of