Une couche absorbante parfaitement adaptée (en anglais Perfectly matched layer, PML) est une couche absorbante artificielle pour les équations d'ondes, couramment utilisée pour tronquer les domaines de calcul dans les méthodes numériques de simulation de problèmes à frontières ouvertes, particulièrement dans les méthodes FDTD et FEM.La propriété essentielle d'une PML qui la distingue d'un matériau absorbant ordinaire est le fait qu'elle est conçue de telle sorte que les ondes incidentes l'atteignant depuis un matériau non PML ne se réfléchissent pas à l'interface.

PropertyValue
dbpedia-owl:abstract
  • Une couche absorbante parfaitement adaptée (en anglais Perfectly matched layer, PML) est une couche absorbante artificielle pour les équations d'ondes, couramment utilisée pour tronquer les domaines de calcul dans les méthodes numériques de simulation de problèmes à frontières ouvertes, particulièrement dans les méthodes FDTD et FEM.La propriété essentielle d'une PML qui la distingue d'un matériau absorbant ordinaire est le fait qu'elle est conçue de telle sorte que les ondes incidentes l'atteignant depuis un matériau non PML ne se réfléchissent pas à l'interface. Cette propriété permet aux PML d'absorber fortement toutes les ondes sortant d'un domaine de calcul sans les renvoyer dans ce domaine.
  • A perfectly matched layer (PML) is an artificial absorbing layer for wave equations, commonly used to truncate computational regions in numerical methods to simulate problems with open boundaries, especially in the FDTD and FE methods. The key property of a PML that distinguishes it from an ordinary absorbing material is that it is designed so that waves incident upon the PML from a non-PML medium do not reflect at the interface—this property allows the PML to strongly absorb outgoing waves from the interior of a computational region without reflecting them back into the interior.PML was originally formulated by Berenger in 1994 for use with Maxwell's equations, and since that time there have been several related reformulations of PML for both Maxwell's equations and for other wave equations. Berenger's original formulation is called a split-field PML, because it splits the electromagnetic fields into two unphysical fields in the PML region. A later formulation that has become more popular because of its simplicity and efficiency is called uniaxial PML or UPML, in which the PML is described as an artificial anisotropic absorbing material. Although both Berenger's formulation and UPML were initially derived by manually constructing the conditions under which incident plane waves do not reflect from the PML interface from a homogeneous medium, both formulations were later shown to be equivalent to a much more elegant and general approach: stretched-coordinate PML. In particular, PMLs were shown to correspond to a coordinate transformation in which one (or more) coordinates are mapped to complex numbers; more technically, this is actually an analytic continuation of the wave equation into complex coordinates, replacing propagating (oscillating) waves by exponentially decaying waves. This viewpoint allows PMLs to be derived for inhomogeneous media such as waveguides, as well as for other coordinate systems and wave equations.
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageExternalLink
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageID
  • 5463176 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageLength
  • 5345 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageOutDegree
  • 7 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 109590905 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink
prop-fr:année
  • 1994 (xsd:integer)
  • 1996 (xsd:integer)
  • 1998 (xsd:integer)
  • 2005 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:auteur
  • F. L. Teixeira W. C. Chew
  • J. Berenger
  • S.D. Gedney
  • W. C. Chew and W. H. Weedon
prop-fr:auteurs
  • Allen Taflove and Susan C. Hagness
prop-fr:doi
  • 10.100200 (xsd:double)
  • 10.100600 (xsd:double)
  • 10.110900 (xsd:double)
prop-fr:isbn
  • 978 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:journal
  • Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on
  • IEEE Microwave and Guided Wave Letters
  • Journal of Computational Physics
  • Microwave Optical Tech. Letters
prop-fr:langue
  • anglais
  • en
prop-fr:lccn
  • 2005045273 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:lieu
  • Boston
prop-fr:numéro
  • 2 (xsd:integer)
  • 6 (xsd:integer)
  • 12 (xsd:integer)
  • 13 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:numéroD'édition
  • 3 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:pages
  • 185 (xsd:integer)
  • 223 (xsd:integer)
  • 599 (xsd:integer)
  • 1630 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:titre
  • Computational Electrodynamics: The Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method, 3rd ed.
  • A 3d perfectly matched medium from modified Maxwell's equations with stretched coordinates
  • An anisotropic perfectly matched layer absorbing media for the truncation of FDTD latices
  • General closed-form PML constitutive tensors to match arbitrary bianisotropic and dispersive linear media
  • A perfectly matched layer for the absorption of electromagnetic waves
prop-fr:volume
  • 7 (xsd:integer)
  • 8 (xsd:integer)
  • 44 (xsd:integer)
  • 114 (xsd:integer)
prop-fr:wikiPageUsesTemplate
prop-fr:éditeur
  • Artech House Publishers
dcterms:subject
rdfs:comment
  • Une couche absorbante parfaitement adaptée (en anglais Perfectly matched layer, PML) est une couche absorbante artificielle pour les équations d'ondes, couramment utilisée pour tronquer les domaines de calcul dans les méthodes numériques de simulation de problèmes à frontières ouvertes, particulièrement dans les méthodes FDTD et FEM.La propriété essentielle d'une PML qui la distingue d'un matériau absorbant ordinaire est le fait qu'elle est conçue de telle sorte que les ondes incidentes l'atteignant depuis un matériau non PML ne se réfléchissent pas à l'interface.
  • A perfectly matched layer (PML) is an artificial absorbing layer for wave equations, commonly used to truncate computational regions in numerical methods to simulate problems with open boundaries, especially in the FDTD and FE methods.
rdfs:label
  • Couche absorbante parfaitement adaptée
  • Perfectly matched layer
owl:sameAs
http://www.w3.org/ns/prov#wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageWikiLink of
is foaf:primaryTopic of