Une cascina, ou cascina a corte (sur cour), est une structure agricole typique de la plaine du Pô lombarde et, pour partie, piémontaise et émilienne.↑ Pluriel : cascine ». La traduction en français est mal aisée, le terme correspondant de manière à la fois plus large et plus restrictive à celui de « ferme » dans son sens général.

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dbpedia-owl:abstract
  • Une cascina, ou cascina a corte (sur cour), est une structure agricole typique de la plaine du Pô lombarde et, pour partie, piémontaise et émilienne.
  • La cascina a corte, o più semplicemente cascina, è una struttura agricola tipica della Pianura Padana lombarda e in parte piemontese ed emiliana, dove si usa prevalentemente il termine di corte colonica.
  • The Italian phrase cascina a corte or, equivalently, cascina lombarda or just cascina (IPA: kaˈʃina) refers to a type of rural building traditional of the Po Valley, especially of Lombardy and of some areas of Piedmont and Emilia-Romagna. Cascine are reported in the Po Valley at least since the 16th century, but they became commonplace in the 18th and 19th century. In particular, during Napoleonic rule, a number of religious buildings were confiscated and transformed into cascine.A typical cascina is a square-yarded farm (sometimes having multiple yards), located at the centre of a large piece of cultivated land. Different types of brick-wall buildings are lined on the perimeter of the courtyard; this typically includes houses (usually a main house for the family of the farm owner or tenant, and simpler buildings for the peasants' families), stables, barns, pits and fountains, ovens, stores, mills and dairies. As most cascine were isolated, semi-autonomous settlements, with sometimes as much as one hundred inhabitants, many of them included public buildings such as churches, inns, or even schools. For the same reason, cascine were sometimes fortified structures, with defensive walls, towers, moats and drawbridges. Cascine are found in most part of the Po Valley; those of the "High Po Valley" (also known as the "Dry Po Valley"), to the north, are usually smaller. While most cascine in the High Valley housed as much as 4-6 families, those of the Low Valley easily reached 10-15 families of inhabitants or more (up to a maximum of 20-25).Peasants working in the cascine, especially in large ones, had specialized jobs. For example, so-called "campari" were responsible for the maintenance of irrigation structures; "bergamini" looked after the cattle; "casari" worked in the dairy; "bifolchi" were responsible for ox-driven tillage (and "cavallanti" for horse-driven tillage); and "contadini" were factotum peasants, although their main task was that of harvesting hay for cattle feeding. In modern Italian language, most of these terms have fallen into disuse, with the exception of "contadini" (which has become the general term to refer to farmers) and "bifolchi" (which is only preserved in a derived, insulting meaning, similar to that of the English word "boor"). Of course, larger cascine also had carpenters, masons, blacksmiths, and other workers whose jobs were not directly related to agriculture or farming. Production in the cascine of the Po Valley mainly consisted in wheat, maize, rice, barley, milk and cheese. Arboriculture was also common; cultivated trees included cottonwood, elm, and mulberry. Cascine located close enough to larger urban areas and cities (e.g., those in the Corpi Santi comune outside the walls of Milan) often specialized in cultivating fresh, perishable vegetables (e.g., cabbage or carrot), that were very profitable in urban markets.Cascine lost their role in the Po Valley economy in the 20th century; many of them were demolished, adapted for other uses (e.g., schools, government buildings, houses, restaurants or hotels) and absorbed into the expanding urban areas. All major airports in the Milanese area, for example, were built on land that was previously occupied by cascine. Nevertheless, cascine are still found in what remains of the Lombard and Po Valley country. For example, it has been reported that at least 43 cascine were still producing milk in the Province of Milan in 2008.A number of modern toponyms in Lombardy and other areas of the Po Valley include the word "Cascina" (sometimes spelled "Cassina") as they refer to settlements which originated from a cascina; examples include Cascina Gobba and Cassina Triulza (neighborhoods of Milan), Cassina de' Pecchi and Cassinetta di Lugagnano.
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  • Bataille de Medole
  • Camparo
  • Campo di Medole
  • Marcita
  • Parco delle Cave
  • Parco di Monza
  • Villa Reale di Monza
  • roggia
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  • it
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  • parc
  • Villa Reale
  • campari
  • marcite
  • rogge
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  • « Le paysage agraire de la Bassa padana irriguée et de la rizière. La diffusion de la cascina a corte » sur le site tecnicocavour-vc.com
  • « De la villa rustique à la cascina a corte » sur le site tecnicocavour-vc.com
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  • Camparo
  • Campo di Medole
  • Marcita
  • Parco delle Cave
  • Parco di Monza
  • roggia
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  • http://www.tecnicocavour-vc.com/1_4A/ambienti.htm
  • http://www.tecnicocavour-vc.com/1_4A/paesaggio%20agrario.htm
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rdfs:comment
  • Une cascina, ou cascina a corte (sur cour), est une structure agricole typique de la plaine du Pô lombarde et, pour partie, piémontaise et émilienne.↑ Pluriel : cascine ». La traduction en français est mal aisée, le terme correspondant de manière à la fois plus large et plus restrictive à celui de « ferme » dans son sens général.
  • La cascina a corte, o più semplicemente cascina, è una struttura agricola tipica della Pianura Padana lombarda e in parte piemontese ed emiliana, dove si usa prevalentemente il termine di corte colonica.
  • The Italian phrase cascina a corte or, equivalently, cascina lombarda or just cascina (IPA: kaˈʃina) refers to a type of rural building traditional of the Po Valley, especially of Lombardy and of some areas of Piedmont and Emilia-Romagna. Cascine are reported in the Po Valley at least since the 16th century, but they became commonplace in the 18th and 19th century.
rdfs:label
  • Cascina (ferme)
  • Cascina
  • Cascina a corte
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